Archive for the ‘brakes’ Tag

Dangerous to drive


It is not often that I feel the need to highlight something on the VT30 failure notice as being dangerous to drive, just recently I have had to use it for brakes and suspension faults. The first case being a pair of rear  leaf springs on a Ford Transit which had fractured at the anchor end spring eye, the only thing holding the spring in place being the weight of the vehicle bearing on the spring eye.

leafspring1

The spring can clearly be seen, from the rust “witness marks” to have worn away at the anchor bracket where it has been moving sideways.

leafspringAnother pair of items to crop up under the dangerous to drive tag was a a pair of front brake hoses on a Ford Maverick these had deteriorated so badly that the braided innards of the hoses were clearly visible

hose1

hose2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earlier in the day a customer had brought us a Mercedes ML320 with a pad warning light on, and asked us to replace the front brake pads as he’d done the rears, or friend had, to save some cash.  Once we’d removed the wheels to replace the front pads we knew they were not the reason for the warning light being illuminated, so we turned to the rears to check the wear sensor wire, immediately noticeable was  the thread of a brake caliper bolt and therefore the lower end of the caliper was not secured and had broken the sensor wire, thus causing the light to come on.

nsrcal1

Had this been the upper caliper bolt it is quite possible that if the caliper had been caught by the wheel rim it would have caused serious damage to the wheel, the caliper and the caliper bracket, with the wheel quite possibly locking up .

nsrcal

Incidents like these are rare but unfortunately they do happen, which is why we have Mot’s, no matter how a good a mechanic you are, or think you are, another pair of eyes checking the work afterwards can be an extra safeguard for vehicles on our busy roads.

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Dangerous tyres once again.


I’m often amazed at the lack of awareness of some drivers.  A Peugeot 307  brought in for mot had an obviously noisy exhaust blow,  the vehicle presenter was surprised when the boss said it was unlikely to pass the test with it blowing as it was.  However we  proceeded to carry out the Mot, before it had even been logged onto the system it was obviously going to be one of those vehicles, just a quick glance before getting into the drivers seat and it was labelled as dangerous to drive.
delaminated-tyre It started poorly and then went from bad to worse, as a glance at the 2 page vt30 shows


The front suspension arm bushes very badly worn and knocking, a rear brake binding, front brakes pulling severely to the right (into the path of oncoming traffic). Never before have I had to issue a VT30 with more than a couple of “dangerous to drive”   items.  Just manoeuvring the vehicle on our forecourt was enough to frighten me, clunking from the suspension, dragging from a rear wheel and then seeing the presence of a child seat in the car was a little worrying too.

This weeks crop


Several items of interest this week, the first is regarding seat belts and their associated mountings.

When a seat belt is attached to the seat, then the seat mountings are checked for security and corrosion in the surrounding area.

On checking a seat on a Ford Ka it was noted that the seat seemed to move a little more than normal when rocked lightly. As the mat above the seat mount was easily lifted, then a further check was simple and disclosed the securing bolt sat beside the seat bracket.

The vehicle presenter had no idea that there was a problem. The vehicle had been regularly serviced by the main dealer and as far as she was aware the seat had never been removed.

The second item concerns standards of corrosion repairs.

A Nissan micra in for MoT had previously had a repair to the rear sill because of corrosion, looking at the repair from outside the vehicle there were signs of welding with a thin skim of body filler and paint to tidy the repair up. The repair felt sound and didn’t “give” under thumb pressure.

Inspection from underneath revealed however that the bottom edge of the patch had had no weld applied at all. The testing standard for patch repairs requires that the repair should be seam welded along every edge.

The third item comes from a vehicle we had in for repair as the brakes felt spongey and was losing brake fluid. On inspection it was immediately obvious a rear brake hose was bulging, we’d had no need to apply pressure to see the problem.

The inner core ofthe hose had deteriorated and was allowing fluid to seep under the outer rubber covering, had it been on a front brake the outer covering would probably have split and caused a serious brake balance problem.

This second image shows how badly the outer covering had stretched when the fluid had seeped into it.

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